Employee Free Choice Act Passes the House

March 2, 2007: The House of Representatives voted by a margin of 241–185 to pass the Employee Free Choice Act (HR 800), which would level the playing field when workers seek to organize a union.

Thirteen Republicans joined 228 Democrats in voting for the bill. Two Democrats and 183 Republicans voted against the bill.

Contact your U.S. Senators today to urge them to vote for the Senate version of the bill sponsored by Ted Kennedy.

The Employee Free Choice Act would give workers greater freedom to join a union by:

  • Establishing stronger penalties for violations of employee rights when workers seek to form a union and during first-contract negotiations,
  • Providing mediation and arbitration for first-contract disputes, and
  • Allowing employees to form unions by signing cards authorizing union representation.

President Bush has vowed to veto the legislation. It’s unclear whether the bill will reach his desk: supporters of the legislation will need 60 votes to overcome a likely Republican-led filibuster.

See how your representatives voted.
Urge your Senators to vote for workers' rights to organize.


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