Rail Workers United vs One person crews

Josh Funk
Associated Press
December 29, 2014

When American freight trains delivered cargo after World War II, the steam-belching beasts commonly had seven people aboard — an engineer, a conductor, up to four brakemen and a fireman.

Trains have since grown much longer, seemingly stretching to the horizon and often taking 20 minutes to pass through a crossing. And crews have been reduced in size — to five people in the 1970s and two in 1991. Now U.S. railroads want to put a single person in charge of today's huge locomotives, taking another step toward a future in which the nation's rail-cargo system increasingly could resemble toy train sets — highly mechanized networks run by computers or distant controllers.

Click here to read more.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
Get Advice Join TDU Donate

Recent News

Building for the Future: New TDU Dues Rates

TDU is on a drive to increase our membership and our war chest. At our recent Convention, members voted to increase TDU membership dues for the first time in 17 years.

Pension Protection Committee Responds to Grassley Bill

The National United Committee to Protect Pensions (NUCPP) has issued a statement in response to the Multiemployer Pension Recapitalization and Reform bill introduced by Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Lamar Alexander (R-TN)

View More News Posts