UPS Takes Business Advice from Scrooge

December 11, 2009: UPS management is cranking down the thermostat, taking a page from one of the worst bosses ever: Ebenezer Scrooge. In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Scrooge would only let his employees burn one lump of a coal at a time.

As freezing temperatures hit most of the country, UPS is cranking down the heat in many buildings as part of a national directive to cut costs.

Management has turned the thermostat down to 45 degrees in Fayetteville, North Carolina. That means many inside workers will be exposed to temperatures much lower—such as members who work near open doors.

Has UPS turned down the heat in your building? Click here to send a report to MakeUPSDeliver.org.

Language in Article 18 gives members some protection from these changes. Contact TDU for grievance advice.

If you’re a clerical employee, you have significantly greater protection under Article 18. In many cases UPS management must provide portable heaters to keep them warm.


Reports from Members

West Tennessee: "I am a mechanic dressing in four layers of clothing, double socks, etc. This Friday I left work with no feeling in my fingers/hands. My feet were so cold every step was painful, not to mention the constant shivering and teeth chattering. They locked all the heaters at 45 degrees, but it was 27 degrees and they still weren't on!!"

Virginia: "I was told by PE that corporate told him that heat does not go on unless it’s below 40. What a joke. The only warm spot in the building for us loaders is in the bathroom."

Chicago: "The temperature in the CACH Hub night sort on December 9 and 10 was about 15 degrees. Totally inhuman."

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