UPS Expands Job-Killing Access Point

The company is installing 300 Access Point “smart” locker locations over the next two months. The number of protections negotiated by the Hoffa-Hall administration? Zero.

access-point-lockers_thumb.jpg

The International Union has the right to bargain with UPS before the company implements programs and technology that affect our jobs.

But the Hoffa-Hall administration has slept while UPS implemented Surepost, ORION, Telematics, and now Access Point.

With Access Point, UPS reroutes undeliverable residential packages to storefronts; the customer is notified and has to go and pick them up.

Access Point takes our work and outsources it to 7-11s, corner stores, and now to “smart lockers.”

UPS first tested the Access Point lockers in Chicago. They’ve been expanded to Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington.

This summer, UPS will install 300 new locations in California, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Texas. 

When it comes to package delivery, the “last mile” is the most expensive.

UPS management wants to make the easy money in the online shopping market, but then dump off the expensive last mile to the post office, 7-11s, and now “smart lockers.”

When local unions sounded the alarm about Access Point at UPS grievance panels, Ken Hall pretended he had never heard of the program.

No single local union can stop UPS from giving away our work through Surepost and Access Point.

We need strong International Union leadership that will protect our work.  

Get Advice Join TDU Donate

Recent News

Zoom Call for IBT Election Volunteers on Saturday, August 14

TDU will hold a national zoom call on Saturday, Aug. 14 for Teamsters who are volunteering to elect the O’Brien-Zuckerman Teamsters United Slate. Join candidates, campaign coordinators and Teamster activists for an update and to make plans to Get Out the Vote and win this fall. Click here to register. 

Central States Assets Fall – But Relief is Coming!

The assets of the Central States Pension Fund fell to $9.8 billion at the end of March, a drop of $573 million in the first quarter.  The fund projects forward that it will pay $2.83 billion in pension benefits this year, while taking in $651 million in employer contributions.

View More News Posts