Rail Workers United vs One person crews

Josh Funk
Associated Press
December 29, 2014

When American freight trains delivered cargo after World War II, the steam-belching beasts commonly had seven people aboard — an engineer, a conductor, up to four brakemen and a fireman.

Trains have since grown much longer, seemingly stretching to the horizon and often taking 20 minutes to pass through a crossing. And crews have been reduced in size — to five people in the 1970s and two in 1991. Now U.S. railroads want to put a single person in charge of today's huge locomotives, taking another step toward a future in which the nation's rail-cargo system increasingly could resemble toy train sets — highly mechanized networks run by computers or distant controllers.

Click here to read more.

Get Advice Join TDU Donate

Recent News

Yellow Trims Losses: Best Quarter in Six Years

Yellow Corporation released its first quarter financials on May 10. The company shows strong improvement but is still not profitable. Yellow’s overall operating ratio of 99.3 percent is 3 percent better than a year ago, but well below other LTL carriers, including ABF and TForce.

 

Sysco Profits Up

Sysco Corp announced its quarterly financial report on May 10, with profits and revenue both up dramatically since last year.  Profits for the quarter were $303.33 million, up from $88.9 million last year. Revenue rose 43% from $11.8 billion to $16.9 billion.

View More News Posts