UPS to pay $70K in religious discrimination suit

Atlanta Business Chronicle
November 06, 2013
Atlanta-based United Parcel Service, Inc., has agreed to pay $70,000 to settle a religious discrimination suit filed by a former employee and Jehovah's Witness, who said the company would not change his schedule to allow him to attend an annual religious service, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
 
The former employee was hired April 2011 as a part-time loader at its Saddle Brook, N.J. facility, the EEOC said in a release. Shortly after his new-employee orientation with UPS, the claimant made a request for a schedule change in order to attend an annual religious service, the EEOC said. His supervisor denied the request for a schedule accommodation and the claimant was terminated from his job just a few days later, the agency added.
 
The EEOC contends the refusal to grant the request for a schedule accommodation and the decision to terminate the claimant constituted religious discrimination. The lawsuit further alleged that after the claimant was terminated from his job, he was placed on a company-wide "do not rehire" list and was unable to get another job with UPS after re-applying elsewhere.
 
According to the EEOC, "In addition to paying the $70,000 in damages to the claimant, UPS is enjoined discriminating against employees based on their religion, or from retaliating against employees for opposing such discrimination. The company has agreed to post its policy outlining the procedure for requesting a religious accommodation in conspicuous places throughout its Saddle Brook location, conduct anti-discrimination training for managers and supervisors, and discuss the policy with employees at the location during pre-work meetings."
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